Rasavahini Test drive: Vespa Elettrica: The cult scooter is quiet

Rasavahini Test drive: Vespa Elettrica: The cult scooter is quiet

Rasavahini                                                                             With a spoon I stir in the head of my cappuccino. The morning sun bathes Piazza Walther in warm light and I try to capture this moment of pleasure: a moment of perfect Italy. Emotions embodied by the scooter manufacturer Piaggio for more than half a century. Over 70 years ago, the Vespa was a cheap everyday vehicle on wheelbarrow tires, that’s not it anymore. And at the latest with the Vespa Elettrica, the Italians have arrived in modern times. (Also interesting: 7 electric sports exotics you’ve never heard of)                          At first glance, the E-Vespa is hardly noticeable.                 © Felix Strohbach             From Bolzano to Merano, there are just 30 kilometers. The battery is charged and the digital display shows 77 kilometer range, we should do that without any problems. Carefully, I turn the handle backwards until the Vespa lunges forward. After my feet are safe again, my companion sits behind me. We also have space for two comfortably on the seat. The acceleration of the Vespa remains sporty throughout the ride, only the range drops slightly faster than expected due to this driving style. On the winding country road, the Vespa feels stable and safe, in parts it goes uphill. Downhill, the Vespa recuperates with a two-stage Kinetic Energy Recovery System. While we swim in the city without any problems in traffic, we are slightly overtaken by land a few times. With displayed 49 km / h we pass only one racing cyclist.                          The display is high quality and clearly arranged.                 © Felix Strohbach             Vespa Elettrica: driving pleasure in power mode After forty minutes, we reach the sign for Merano. 53 Kilometer remaining range should be enough for the way back. With a sense of security, we meander through the city traffic, drive through historic archways and explore Merano comfortably from the scooter. Again and again I turn the handle briefly to the stop backwards and enjoy the full acceleration. From the quiet whir of the electric motor undisturbed, we talk about possible cafes on the roadside, which we could head for. Through the many roundabouts, pedestrian areas and one-way streets, we circulate several times around the city center, until we find a parking space. Silently, we glide on the sidewalk and join the other two-wheeler. With momentum I jack up the 130 kilogram heavy E-Vespa and let the steering wheel lock engage. A helmet fits under the seat, the second we have to take. Time for an espresso break in the sun.                          Only those who look closely notice the missing exhaust system.                 © Felix Strohbach             Before embarking on the return journey, I try to connect my smartphone to the Vespa. Unfortunately, I first have to download the associated app and register to find out that I do not have the right helmet for the Bluetooth communication system. The app also allows you to transfer messages to the Vespa display without a helmet, display the parking position and save current vehicle data. I turn the key and switch to reverse. A beep signal sounds and repeats every two seconds. The otherwise quiet Vespa has been transformed into a truck for a short time. Embarrassed, I roll backwards and switch quickly back into forward gear. Despite enough range I choose the mode “ECO”. The acceleration is now gentler and at indicated 34 km / h is over. That’s just enough for the viscous traffic in the city center. As soon as the traffic rolls again I switch back to the mode “POWER”. Bolzano direction is slightly downhill. We drive past petrol stations with expensive petrol prices and reach the sign Bolzano about half an hour later. After a few laps through the city, a yellow battery icon lights up. (******************************************************************************************************************************************************                          Blue trim frames the sweeping silhouette.                 © Felix Strohbach             Charged forward in four hours, turn handlebars and push backwards. And again. After a few tries, the Vespa is backwards at a window. I unlock the seat pad and flap it forward. A gas station plug icon indicates the charging cable. The batteries are firmly installed in the Vespa and the cable is two meters short. I pull the cable out as far as possible and pass it through the open window. With a multiple socket we bridge the distance to the nearest outlet. Switch on and the charging process begins. The seat cushion can be closed thanks to a small opening for the cable, the window must remain open. Almost four hours later, the room is heated and the Vespa loaded.                          The permanently installed batteries are a disadvantage.                 © Felix Strohbach             Conclusion Up to 200 Newton meters of torque feel powerful and two people carry the Vespa over 70 kilometers. For everyday use removable batteries would be much more useful, not everyone has an external socket or can leave his window open for several hours. The Vespa Elettrica is of high quality and exudes comfort and luxury. Even with an electric motor, it embodies the Italian attitude to life that stands for the Piaggio brand. At least 6. 390 euros will cost the first electric Vespa. A cappuccino at the Piazza Walther in Bolzano costs 2, 90 Euro and sun is free. (Also read: Fiat 500 Jolly Spiaggina Icon-e: So drives the Fiat classic car with electric motor)                                                                                                               
Read More

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *