Melania Trump Just Introduced Her 2019 White House Christmas Decorations

Melania Trump Just Introduced Her 2019 White House Christmas Decorations

First Lady Melania Trump has marked the holiday season with the (*****) White House Christmas decorations and the theme is “The Spirit of America.”
That much is clear everywhere you look from the halls decked with “Be Best” ornaments to the model of the White House featuring mini holiday wreaths on its windows.
“The Spirit of America” is shining in the @WhiteHouse! I am delighted to share this beautiful exhibit of patriotism for all to see, and excited for everyone to experience the beauty of the #Christmas season!” she tweeted alongside a short video that features her sprinkling fake snow and examining the festive decor.

This year’s decorative approach features glittery patriotism throughout (********) Pennsylvania Avenue.

Officials selected a towering (*************)-foot Douglas fir as this year’s traditional official White House Christmas tree, harvested from the Mahantongo Valley Farms in Pitman, Pennsylvania farm. It arrived with some help from the farm’s owner Larry Snyder last Monday.

The (*****) White House holiday decor has been in the works for months. The First Lady began her planning back in July, according to a White House statement. “She was dead on schedule,” says Coleen Christian Burke, author of Christmas with the First Ladies, a book that chronicles Christmas at the White House starting from Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis to Michelle Obama.

Burke, who has firsthand experience under her tinsel tool belt as a three-time White House Christmas decorations worker who trimmed trees for Laura Bush and Michelle Obama, says that every year the White House Christmas decoration production is a spectacle no matter who’s in office.

“It’s like Christmas on steroids,” she says. “The scale is so enormous.”

The Cross Hall leading into the State Dinning Room is decorated during the (*****) Christmas preview at the White House, Monday, Dec. 2, (*****), in Washington.
AP—Copyright (*****) The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

It’s likely only a matter of time before the internet descends with memes of this year’s display.

The White House made of gingerbread also features landmarks from around the country in the State Dinning Room during the (*****) Christmas preview at the White House, Monday, Dec. 2, (*****), in Washington.
AP—Copyright (*****) The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

The Red Room is decorated with games, including a tree made of White House playing cards during the (*****) Christmas preview at the White House, Monday, Dec. 2, (*****), in Washington.
AP—Copyright (*****) The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

That was the case when Melania ran with a berry red color palette throughout the house for the “American Treasures” theme for last year’s decorations. The red represented the stripes found on the presidential seal signifying valor and bravery, according to the White House—but that’s not what the internet saw.

Late night comedians followed with the “blood tree” joke offensive.

Get The Brief. Sign up to receive the top stories you need to know right now.

Thank you!

For your security, we’ve sent a confirmation email to the address you entered. Click the link to confirm your subscription and begin receiving our newsletters. If you don’t get the confirmation within (**************) minutes, please check your spam folder.

The reaction was so strong that FLOTUS eventually issued a response. “We are in the (************)st century and everybody has a different taste. I think they look fantastic,” Melania said days after the presentation.

The East Room is decorated during the (*****) Christmas preview at the White House, Monday, Dec. 2, (*****), in Washington.
AP—Copyright (*****) The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

The First Family’s annual ornament, the American flag, decorates a tree during the (*****) Christmas preview at the White House, Monday, Dec. 2, (*****), in Washington.
AP—Copyright (*****) The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

The Christmas decorations at the White House in (******) were an overt wink at the past with a twist

Burke says Melania’s red cranberry trees followed in a long crimson tradition.

“What she was doing with those very large cranberry trees was throwing back to history and reinterpreting it,” Burke says. “They were fake cranberries, but it was a real connection to First Ladies.”
First Lady Betty Ford was the first to introduce the cranberry tree in the red room in the ’(*********)s. The annual tradition continued each year until Mrs. Obama opted for a cranberry garland over the fireplace. “That was a big deal in the decorating community,” Burke says.
“What people didn’t realize was that this was a historical homage to First Lady decorating with a different way of looking at cranberry. I think that got completely lost in the internet sensation of ‘these trees look scary,” she added.

Christmas Trees line the hall during the White House Christmas preview in the Cross Hall of the White House on Monday, Nov. (***********), (******) in Washington, DC. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
The Washington Post—The Washington Post/Getty Images

Melania Trump’s (*******) White House decorations were another playful memory lane trip

Christmas decorations in a hallway of the East Wing of the White House during a press preview of the (*******) holiday decorations November (**********), (*******) in Washington, DC. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Alex Wong—Getty Images

Burke explained that the volunteer decorators are the foot soldiers executing the First Lady’s vision.

In (*******), Melania’s vision explored the “Time-Honored Traditions” theme, which was apt as Melania tipped her hat to plenty of landmark White House Christmas decoration moments.

She’s not alone. Burke says First Ladies always borrow and build on each other’s ideas. “They all put their own spin on it,” Burke says.
Remember the Nutcracker ballet dancers from Melania’s inaugural presentation? Apparently, that’s a take on a popular tradition.

First Lady Jackie Kennedy was the first to use a theme to unite her Christmas decorating efforts. Her opener? The Nutcracker, according to Burke, who says that subsequent First Ladies, including Hillary Clinton and Barbara Bush, chose the George Balanchine’s ballet as a theme or just a reference several times in the ensuing years.
Melania’s white tree-lined hallway also earned the ire of the internet, where critics compared it to everything from Narnia to the creepy upside down world in the Netflix series Stranger Things.

But Burke says the hallway decor wasn’t a departure from past First Ladies’ choices. “The First Ladies always loved a snowy look, and she recognized how beautiful it was,” she says, adding that the red topiary roping wrapping the branches was a nod to Laura Bush.

O.K. Remind me what Michelle Obama’s Christmas decorations were like again

(*)(**)Read More(***)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *